Fanny Sanin

Bogota

Pintores (Abstraccion geometrica, acrilico, oleo)

Abstracto, Geométrico

Fanny San�n, pintora - fotograf�a por Olga Luc�a Jord�n

Fanny San�n 

pintora abstracta

A ColArte
 
ENLACE INCLUIDO

 

ENLACES

http://fannysanin.com/home/artwork/

 
A ColArte

Ida Ely Rubin, art critic, New York, 1980  
Fernando Gamboa, Director, Museum of Modern Art, Mexico City, 1979  
Germán Rubiano Caballero, Director Institute of Esthetic Studies, Bogotá, 1979  
Carla Gottlieb, art histonan, New York, 1976 
Eduardo Serrano, Curador, Museum of Modern Art, Bogotá. 1979 
Clayton Kirking, New York, June 2003 
Edward J. Sullivan, Latin Collector Gallery 2004 
ArtNexus, 2007 

Margarita Nelken, Diario Excelsior, México. 1965. 
Jorge Crespo de la Serna. Diario Novedades, México. 1965. 
Marta Traba. Diario El Tiempo, Bogotá. 1966 
 
Martha Traba, El Tiempo, Bogota-Colombia, 1966. 
Nolasco Alvarez. Diario El Nacional, Caracas 1967. 
Miyo Vestrini. La República , Caracas. 1967. 
Cottie Burland. The Arts Review , London, 1968. 
Carla Gottlieb. Phoenix Gallery, New York. 1977 Museo de Arte Moderno, México,1979 
Madeleine Burnside, New York. East Side Express, 1977. 
Edgar Buonagurio. Arts Magazine, New York. 1977. 
José Luis Colin. El Nacional, México, 1979 
Fernando Gamboa. Director del Museo de Arte Moderno, México, 1979.

Mireya Folch. Sol de México, 1979
Ida Ely Rubin, New York, 1979.   
Mario Amaya, Nueva York, 1986 
José Roca, Banco de La República, 2001
María Cristina Pignalosa, Redactora de El Tiempo, 2005  
María Cristina Pignalosa, Redactora de El Tiempo - Exposición en Roma, 2007  
Prensa exposición en el Instituto Italo-Latino Americano, Roma 2007
Una vida hecha color, por Lorena Machado Fiorillo, 2010
Exposición en Durban Segnini, Miami, 2010, por Carlos M. Luis 
Artes y letras, por Joaquín Bajados 
La armonía en el color, por Diego Guerrero
 
Fanny Sanín on Paper, Patterson Sims 
Alister Martínez Márquez:  "Mi tema es el color"
M. Belén Sáez de Ibarra 

Exposición en el Instituto Italo-Latino Americano   
Grado Honoris Causa conferido por la Universidad de Antioquia (2015)     
Exposición EN ABSTRACTO y donación al Museo Nacional, 2015

 

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Cr�tica

SELECTIONS FROM INTERNACIONAL REVIEWS

Of all the countries in Latin America, it is Colombia in recent decades which has been represented in the United States by the largest number of gifted artists. Among these ambassadors of art, Sanin has won great respet for her authentic personal style. Unmarked by the tyranny of changing fads, she has continued to proceed on her chosen path. She has created an art in which her mastery of color is second only to her increasingly audacious compositions.

Ida Ely Rubin, art critic, New York, 1980

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In spite of the sober clarity of her canvases and of their absolute rectangularlity, Fanny Sanin has to be describes foremost a colorist. Her handsome chromatie chords are unmistakable. She prefers the secondary tones, among them turquoise, lilac, and other cool shades-. With their sobriety and even ssolemnity, they impart to the structural rigor of her paintings a highly poetic touch of melancholy.

Fernando Gamboa, Director, Museum of Modern Art, Mexico City, 1979

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Each painting is an integrated and complex set of quadrangular forms, rectangles for the most part, that fall on each side of a vertical .... Its could be said that all the work of the composition is aimed at bringin out that central presence.

The same could be said about the color. The chromatic associations in many cases muted, often searching for subtle changes of �ntensity, always refined and un common-seem to want to emphasize th�t mysterious, maybe sacred, zone.

Germ�n Rubiano Caballero, D�rector Institute of Esthetic Studies, Bogota, 1979

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Like many of her contemporaries, S�nin expresses herself best on large canvases .... Handling such large surfaces, it should be noted, is a physical strain for a painter who is not endowed with muscular strength. Sanin, however, is an active and dedicated artist, a determined and strong-willed person. If the flamboyance of her working on large surfaces is at, variance with their cool tones, the result creates conflict a component of all good art.

Carla Gottlieb, art histonan, New York, 1976

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Fanny Sanin creates calrn works that simultaneously tesitify to clear judgment and to acute sensibility. Her work is a reex�mination of the geometric abstraction in its particular terms, and their pleasant and serene result is an exam ple of the refinement that can be reached with the conscious exploration and development of a highly personal taste.

Eduardo Serrano, Curador, Museum of Modern Art, Bogot�. 1979

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THE SUBLIME NEOGEOMETRY OF FANNY SAN�N

In 1936, for the exhibition Cubism and Abstract Art, Alfred Barr, Director of the Museum of Modern Art designed a chart graphically illustrating the development of abstract art from 1890 to 1935. Barr fixes the earliest progenitor of geometric abstraction with C�zanne and traces it through Cubism, Suprematism, Constructivism, Neoplasticim, and the Bauhaus to 1935. In 1934 Joaqu�n Torres Garc�a, returned to Montevideo after living for forty three years in Europe. Torres-Garc�a brought with him "...a desire to create an `American art with pre-Hispanic Andean roots...Torres-Garcias Americanist enterprise was, however, based on the most advanced European abstract movements -Constructivism and Neo Plasticism- and it was as a link to those movements that he influenced the developments under discussion here."

The history of abstract art in Lat�n America is a complicated one and, to some extent, is the aggrega tion of stories from many countries. While there was a great deal of interchange and "cross-pollination" the movement, if it is considered as such, developed in a diversity of national and political contexts. Mary Schneider Enr�quez confirms this intricacy: "Although the evolution of geometric abstraction in Lat�n Ameri can art has a complex history, one thing is clear: the artists projects and explorations were fueled by a desire for radical change." In the early years of the twentieth century the art market in Colombia was still stalled in the residual tastes of the colonial period and the nineteenth century. However, by the late 1950s Edgar Negret, Eduardo Ram�rez Villamizar, David Manzur, and Omar Rayo were producing and exhibiting geometrically abstracted works of both painting and sculpture. With this in mind, it would be possible to protract Barrs graph and thread it through Montevideo, Argentina, Brazil, Venezuela, and Bogot�. It was in this atmosphere that Fanny San�n emerged as an artist who was ready for a change and willing to accept the responsibility necessary to meet the challenge of radical change.

Fanny San�n, born in 1938, graduated with a Masters of Fine Arts from the Universidad de los Andes at Bogot� in 1960. From the earliest period of her career San�n manifested a profound dedication to abstraction.

While her first abstract works fall finto the category of lyrical or expressionist abstraction, by 1969 she had migrated to the field of hard-edged painting. Then, seemingly abruptly, in 1970 she changed her medium from oil paint to acrylic and began a series of "stripe paintings". The change to acrylic was a logical one, given that the properties of the paint allow the definition of a precise, straight, or hard edge. From that year to the present Fanny San�n has continued to devote herself to the development of her visual vocabulary of form, composition and color.

Looking at paintings by Fanny San�n is an intellectual exercise in meditation and contemplation, which does, however, require an informed approach. Following her series of stripe paintings, her work quickly evolved into extremely elaborate compositions. Throughout the 1980s the images became increasingly complex, leading to her very rich production during the decade of the nineties. Since the turn of the century, she has entered a period of extraordinary confidence and sophistication. Acrylic No. 3, 2001 embodies all of the qualities that distinguish her work. The composition of this picture is completely controlled, and nothing is left to chance. The design elements recall Josef Albers and his lnteraction of Color (1963). The experience of paging through Albers portfolio of relatively simple compositions can begin to prepare one to look more discerningly at San�n. But, as in Albers, the interaction here between color and composition creates the "finished" painting. The painting really cannot exist without both of these elements. At the same time, these highly organized qualities lend an ambiguity that allows ample room for individual, subjective interpretation.

Clearly, these paintings would be rendered lifeless if seen in a monochrome, or shades of gray. It is the color that binds with the compositional elements of each work and gives depth and substance to the static geometry, which forms the structure of each picture. Her remarkable talent to control both of these elements-color and composition-has allowed San�n to create, over the last thirty-three years, a body of work that remains very true to her intellectual convictions, but loes not allow for repetition. Her studies, compositions and acrylics depend upon a diversity of line, form, composition, and color that make each unique, but identifiable as an individual part of a larger oeuvre.

In her finished pieces, perhaps more sublimely in the acrylics, there is often an engaging sense of meditation or contemplation. There is a compulsion to "enter" these works, to try to grasp the subtleties of the concrete, formal relationships and the essence of the whole. This is, of course, at the heart of the consideration of abstraction. This quality of introspection, or experienc ing a painting as a discrete creation, without the representation of an object is one of the driving (orces here and of related work. Ad Reinhardt (1913-1967) executed studies in single colors (Black Painting, 1952/3) that would compare to Fannys use of color, in which variations are so slight as to be almost imperceptible. Reinhardt is able to involve the viewer with a single color, on an apparently single plane, with the same intensity and depth. In spite of his association with the abstract expressionists, Reinhardt succeeded not only in abandoning the object and representation, but also left be hind the emotionality often seen in the expressionists. The grid paintings of Agnes Martin (1912 - ), where color sometimes seems to levitate off the surface of the can vas, are equally important examples of completely non representational work that can captivate both the eye and the mind. As seen in Acrylic No. 2, 2001, Fanny San�n has reached this same level of expression through the deliberate, concentrated development of her own visual idiom. 

The production of her paintings is accomplished with careful planning and great consideration. In general, the artist begins with a study, the equivalent of a drawing done with acrylic paint on paper. She may do many of these until the desired concept is captured, that with the most successful impact. These studies may then be translated into compositions, acrylic on paper or acrylics, which are acrylic paint on canvas. While the studies help to solidify the ult�mate composition, the selection and perfection of the colors occupy a large portion of the time needed to conceive, plan and finish a painting. Mixing and re-mixing dozens of colors until the right hue is achieved, is critical to the look and impression of the final piece. The repetitiveness of this process, with the endless variation of color that is possible, is apparent in the meditative or transcendental qualities of these pictures

In his introductory essay for Abstraction, Geometry, Painting: Selected Geometric Abstract Painting in America Since 1945, Michael Auping observes that "The central issues surrounding abstraction and its relation to the world in which we live are at the very heart of what we think of as modern, and although we have lived with abstraction for almost a century, we would be less than honest if we did not admit that it remains a relatively new language with a complex vocabulary that is still being unraveled"3 Fanny San�n confronted the issues of abstraction in the earliest moments of her career. She has continued to define modernism, her art, and her self within the act of meeting that challenge. As she has mastered this complex language, her paintings continue significantly to the unraveling of the meaning of abstraction. In that way, her art also illuminates our "...relation to the world in which we live."

Clayton Kirking, New York, June 2003

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Concrete Realities: The art of Fanny Sanin

by Edward J. Sullivan

On regards Latincollector Gallery exhibition, 2004

Fanny San�ns New York apartment in the Upper East Side of Manhattan is also the studio where she works daily, following a strict schedule of painting and drawing. The panorarnic windows allow as much light as possible to permeate the spacious studio and she often spends long periods of time contemplating the sky and the pattems of clouds over the city. She is inherently affected by the subtly changing colors of daylight at the various times of the year and admits that these variations in climactic tonalities are important influences on her imagination.

Upon entering San�ns apartment virtually the first thing one sees is a large abstract canvas. done in the early 1960s. It is a lush and gesturally generous composition with intersecting patterns of form and color. Although th�s painting is virtually at the opposite end of the visual spectrum from the type of strictly controlled geometric forms that she creates today. there is much in this highly expression�st composition that serves as the basis for the rest of her career. The artists deeply visceral relation
ship to color experimentation began in the earliest phases of her development and continues today. While there appears to be an unending variety of shapes that she is able to manipulate in her canvases, watercolors and prints, there seems to be an even deeper well of color combinations from which she draws. At times the color harmonies are muted, understated and tame. At others, there is a violently jarring dissonance to the tones. In San�ns work the most unexpected colors coexist in a state of harmony that would be unimagin able in the art of a more conventional personality. It is interesting to note that the influential critic Marta Traba (who spent long periods of time in Bogot� and encouraged San�n to present her first one-artist exhibition) signaled (in a 1966 newspaper article) the sense of "organic life" in her work. This is certainly true of the vigorous use of color that has persisted throughout the painters career, but it is also still a major elementment in the suggestions of pulsating vibrancy that she creates in her juxtapositions of space, mass and void. 

San�ns uncompromising dedication to hard edged abstraction is now more than thirty five years old. She has drawn the inspiration for her geometric compositions from many of the same sources as those of Herrera. From her for mal training in Colombia and London and her intense travel schedule, she has been able to observe, first hand, examples of virtually all of the major avant-garde movements in the Americas and Europe. The classic names: Mondrian, the Russian Constructivists, the mid century geometric masters such as Ellsworth Kelly and others, are all present in the repertory of images that San�n has, literally, at her finger tips.lt is also important to situate her within a Colombian context, as the artist has constant contact with the art world in Bogot� and, unlike so many expatriate artists, San�n forms as much a part of the intellectual milieu of that city as she does of her adopted Manhattan.  She retums to Colombia with great frequency and has had numerous major exhibitions there, including the most recent retrospective held in the Colombian capital (at the Biblioteca Luis Angel Arango) and Barranquilla in 2000. 

One can date the birth of abstraction in Colombia to the 1949 exhibition of painter Marco Ospina who shocked his contemporaries and his audience with his abstract paintings. Since then such figures as Eduardo Ram�rez Villamizar, Omar Rayo and many others created a loosely-defined "school" of both lyric and hard edge abstractionists that figures among the most distinguished in South America. Fanny San�n certainly plays a major role in this group.

Fanny San�n did not study architecture, yet there is a remarkable architectonic disposition to her art. Indeed, many of her composit�ons could be defined as studies for imaginary buildings in a monumental, utopian city. She is able to suggest a powerful interplay of interlocking solid forms that take on an atmosphere of structural coherence, yet never are so literally defined as to become illustra tions for a built environment. San�n has always been attracted to monumental form. As mentioned above, the buildings of New York City are a constant presence in her visual imagination. In other moments of her life she has been deeply impressed by ancient forms. Mexico has been, since the several years she spent there beginning in 1963, a major point of visual and emotional reference. The colossal structures of the Aztec and Maya civilizations, among others, left an indelible impression on her. The monuments of ancient Egypt or the Greco-Roman buildings throughout the Mediterranean basin have been an equal stimulation. In the end, however, it is the uniqueness of the inexplicable artistic impulse that creates the images that are so characteristic of the work of this painter.

Edward J. Sullivan, Latin Collector Gallery 2004

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Exhibition "The Chromatic Structures of Fanny Sanin, 1974-2007" 

Instituto Italo-Latino Americano
Palazzo Santacroce � Piazza Benedetto Cairoli, 3 � 00186 Roma

�For the city of Rome, accustomed to great artists, it will be a privilege to receive the Colombian master painter Fanny Sanin at the Gallery of the Instituto Italo-Latino Americano. After a few minutes of attentively examining the paintings, trying to decipher the equation of its narrative, I decide to let myself be taken in by the rhythm of its multicolor geometry. Then, Fanny�s ouvre begins to transform itself as a catalyst between the critical thought and the meditative experience of the abstract language, which allows and looks for the interior relaxation that without violence cleanses the mental murmur and reactive thought, and permits us to reach our inner silence. Is as if the mind ceased its �judicious� action letting it be rocked in its entirety in the world of the senses where colors grow, intensify and surround us. It is a game of the mind which needs to be freed from the nervous attachment to control and the common linguistic codification. Only then, the geometry of the work appears accessible and sweet. All that is needed is to let yourself be taken in.� Patricia Rivadeneira, Cultural Secretary, Instituto Italo-Latino Americano, Exhibition catalogue, Introduction

�Fanny San�n is probably the most understated international painter of stature that Colombia has produced in the last thirty years. The three decades represented in this exhibition attest to her evolution within the realm of geometric abstraction, which she has approached with the same coherence, the same systematic and persistent work, that a mathematician would demonstrate in trying to find the solution to the most complicated of equations. And as happens in such a process, the elusive nature of multiple expressions appears to provoke the reformulation of its validity over and over again.� F�lix �ngel, Exhibition Curator, Catalogue essay: The Chromatic Structures of Fanny Sanin, 1974-2007

�Fanny San�n�s deeply visceral relationship to color experimentation began in the earliest phases of her development and continues today. While there appears to be an unending variety of shapes that she is able to manipulate in her canvases, watercolors and prints, there seems to be an even deeper well of color combinations from which she draws. At times the color harmonies are muted, understated and tame. At others, there is a violently jarring dissonance to the tones. In San�n�s work the most unexpected colors coexist in a state of harmony that would be unimaginable in the art of a more conventional personality. It is interesting to note that the influential critic Marta Traba signaled the sense of �organic life� in her work. This is certainly true of the vigorous use of color that has persisted throughout the painter�s career, but it is also still a major element in the suggestions of pulsating vibrancy that she creates in her juxtapositions of space, mass and void�It is the uniqueness of the inexplicable artistic impulse that creates the images that are so characteristic of the work of this painter.� Edward J. Sullivan, Catalogue essay, Concrete Realities: The Art of Carmen Herrera, Fanny San�n and Mira Schendel, Latin Collector, New York, 2004

�This crisp, handsome show picks up a thread of geometric abstraction in 20th-century Latin American art, and follows it in the work of three women who have made significant contributions to the history of the art�The paintings of the Colombian-born artist Fanny Sanin are made up of smoothly intersecting and overlapping planes of warm colors �red, yellow, terra cotta � that bring to mind monumental architecture�The precision-tooled work of Ms. Sanin offer yet another reason, in this case a very subtle one, to consider geometric abstraction one of the great experimental inventions of modern art.� Holland Cotter, On the Latin Collector exhibition, Concrete Realities: The Art of Carmen Herrera, Fanny San�n and Mira Schendel, The New York Times, May 14, 2004

�It is the color that binds with the compositional elements of each work and gives depth and substance to the static geometry, which forms the structure of each picture. Her remarkable talent to control both of these elements�color and composition�has allowed San�n to create, over the last thirty-three years, a body of work that remains very true to her intellectual convictions, but does not allow for repetition. Her studies, compositions and acrylics depend upon a diversity of line, form, composition, and color that make each unique, but identifiable as an individual part of a larger oeuvre.�In her finished pieces, perhaps more sublimely in the acrylics, there is often an engaging sense of meditation or contemplation. There is a compulsion to �enter� these works, to try to grasp the subtleties of the concrete, formal relationships and the essence of the whole. This is, of course, at the heart of the consideration of abstraction. This quality of introspection or experiencing a painting as a discrete creation, without the representation of an object is one of the driving forces here.� Clayton Kirking. Catalogue essay, The Sublime Neogeometry of Fanny San�n, Gomez Gallery, Baltimore, 2003

�San�n�s works posses a transcendental character that invites contemplation, a visual and emotional depth achieved through color that, in a sense, contradicts the hard-edge flatness of her pictorial proposition. Faithful to a compositional line that has remained constant for more than three decades, most of San�n�s pieces are structures around a focal element � a square or a band of contrasting color � that marks the horizontal axis and balances the composition. A new element, for a repertoire that has consisted almost exclusively of horizontal, vertical, and diagonal bands, appears in her more recent works: the formal interplay between curves with different radiu, some of which carry forward the pieces� vertical lines and give the composition a subtly sensual dynamic. Another new element is San�n�s pencil lines brought in as active parts of the composition, traversing color fields and altering them with the diagonal tensions they create.� Jos� Roca, Review on Fanny San�n�s exhibition at the Gomez Gallery, Baltimore, Art Nexus, p. 128, No. 52, Vol. 3, 2004

�For many years San�n has specialized in a particularly rich form of geometric abstraction (i.e., nonrepresentational pictures made up of hard-edged forms such as rectangles and triangles). She is constantly experimenting with different colors, shapes, proportions, and arrangements. San�n typically makes a number of small studies in acrylic on paper before painting her final canvases. Although each study has obvious ties to all the rest, every painting also displays its own distinctive �personality�� Spatial games are an important part of San�n�s work; she deliberately keeps the relationships among her forms ambiguous, so that each viewer can interpret them in her own way.�
Nancy G. Heller, Why a Painting is Like a Pizza � A Guide to Understanding and Enjoying Modern Art, Princeton University Press, p. 39, 2002

�The number of variations in San�n�s painting is admirable. Perhaps the predominant element in her recent work is the increment in the number of elements of composition and their contrast � mainly between the large and the smaller ones. There is also more tension, opposition and contrast between apparent projections and recessions. Undoubtedly, there is an increasing complexity, where it appears that the composition is on the brink of disintegration; however, all the elements are controlled simultaneously, organized to the smallest detail� Until now, Fanny San�n�s work has moved along a continuous path, slowly developing from certain basic and enduring ideas. This is why she persists in abstract work, following a long tradition associated with geometric forms. This is why she persists in symmetric acrylic compositions reminiscent of classical styles. And this is why she is still persuaded that using such compositional elements as form and color are sufficient to convey emotional and spiritual contents, the latter being understood as the common ground between human being and culture.� Germ�n Rubiano, Catalogue essay, Fanny San�n, Color and Symmetry, A Retrospective Exhibition, Luis �ngel Arango Art Center, Bogot�, 2000

Tomado de ArtNexus, 2007